Skeletal Structure In Dogs

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"There are two means of refuge from the miseries of life: music and cats."

- Albert Schweitzer

Dogs Skeletal Structure

The skeletal frame of the dog consists of 319 bones. If a dog's tail is docked or absent at birth, there obviously are fewer bones in the skeleton. The muscles and tendons of a dog are similar to those of a human; however, a dog's upper body muscles bear half the weight of the entire body and are better developed than a human's. The weight distribution between the front and the rear of the dog are relatively equal.

Bulldog dog pictureBulldog

Dogs are running animals, with the exception of those bred specifically for different purposes. For instance, the bulldog, with its large head and short, "bowed" legs (see photograph), cannot be called a creature born to chase game. Most dogs, however, are well equipped to run or lope over long distances, provided that they are physically conditioned for such activities.

The construction of the shoulder and pelvic bones and the way they articulate with the leg bones and the spine allow most breeds to trot, run, or gallop with ease. Certain breeds have distinct gaits that have been genetically selected by humans. The German shepherd dog is known for its "flying trot." The extreme extension of the front and rear legs causes the dog to appear as if it were soaring, although one foot always remains on the ground. Another unique gait is that of the greyhound.

This dog was bred for great bursts of speed, and its most comfortable gait is the gallop. The spine is unusually flexible, allowing the dog to contract and extend its four legs in unison, whereby all four feet are off the ground at the same time.

Other breeds also have unique features. The Afghan hound was bred to chase game over long distances in rocky terrain. Its structure permits great flexibility through the hip joints and lower back, enabling the dog to turn quickly in a small area. The dachshund, by contrast, is long and low with short legs (see photograph). This dog was bred to hunt badgers underground, and its shape allows it to enter subterranean tunnels in search of its prey.

Although most breeds no longer follow the pursuits for which they were originally bred, their instincts remain strong, and their structure still allows them to perform their specific tasks.

Source: "dog." Encyclopędia Britannica from Encyclopędia Britannica 2007 Ultimate Reference Suite.(2007).

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